Abstract

Psychopathy has been defined as including deficits in affective, cognitive, and behavioral functioning. Due to the severity of these deficits, several etiological theories have emerged in an attempt to better understand the personality construct. The response modulation hypothesis (RMH; Patterson & Newman, 1993) is a theory growing in popularity among researchers and posits that an inability to reallocate attentional resources to peripheral information moderates the affective and behavioral deficits commonly documented within individuals with psychopathy. Thus, the present study attempted to examine to test the validity of the RMH in a non-incarcerated population. The results somewhat support the theory that subcortical-cortical circuitry is at least partly involved in how individuals with psychopathic traits process all information. As Coldheartedness increased interference from positively and negatively arousing distractors was similar. Likewise, increasing levels of Self-Centered Impulsivity were found to be associated with better accuracy. However, some traits of psychopathy were associated with more distraction. Future studies should consider determining which traits of psychopathy tend to moderate attentional focus and resultant affective processing.

LLU Discipline

Clinical Psychology

Department

Clinical Psychology

School

School of Behavioral Health

First Advisor

Haerich, Paul E.

Second Advisor

Burley, Todd D.

Third Advisor

Mallery, Suzanne T.

Fourth Advisor

Vermeersch, David

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Degree Level

Ph.D.

Year Degree Awarded

2014

Date (Title Page)

9-2014

Language

English

Library of Congress/MESH Subject Headings

Clinical Psychology, Psychopaths, Antisocial Personality Disorders

Subject - Local

Psychopathy, Cognitive Functioning, Etiological Theories, Response Modulation Hypothesis, Attentional Focus, Affective Processing

Type

Dissertation

Page Count

74

Digital Format

PDF

Digital Publisher

Loma Linda University Libraries

Usage Rights

This title appears here courtesy of the author, who has granted Loma Linda University a limited, non-exclusive right to make this publication available to the public. The author retains all other copyrights.

Collection

Loma Linda University Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Collection Website

http://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/

Repository

Loma Linda University. Del E. Webb Memorial Library. University Archives

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