Author

Kimberly Doe

Abstract

Chinese American families are often underrepresented within the family therapy literature. This grounded theory study used a symbolic interaction framework to understand how second generation young adults locate themselves within the larger cultural context to construct an individual ideology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Chinese American young adults between the ages of 18-24. Family and cultural experiences influences how young adults develop and transition from childhood to adolescence to young adulthood. This study suggests the importance for family therapists to identify Chinese American young adults’ experiences and their development to understand how multiple factors impact their construction of “I”.

LLU Discipline

Marital and Family Therapy

Department

Counseling and Family Sciences

School

School of Behavioral Health

First Advisor

Fox, Curtis A.

Second Advisor

Distelberg, Brian

Third Advisor

Oloo, Winetta Baker

Fourth Advisor

Shih, Kristy

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Degree Level

Ph.D.

Year Degree Awarded

2014

Date (Title Page)

9-2014

Language

English

Library of Congress/MESH Subject Headings

Chinese American Families, Family Therapy, Grounded Theory, Symbolic Interactionism

Subject - Local

Symbolic Interaction Framework, Individual Ideology

Type

Dissertation

Page Count

115

Digital Format

PDF

Digital Publisher

Loma Linda University Libraries

Usage Rights

This title appears here courtesy of the author, who has granted Loma Linda University a limited, non-exclusive right to make this publication available to the public. The author retains all other copyrights.

Collection

Loma Linda University Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Collection Website

http://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/

Repository

Loma Linda University. Del E. Webb Memorial Library. University Archives

Included in

Counseling Commons

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