Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and infants is a primary cause of cognitive and behavioral problems that can persist through adulthood. In this study, the long-term behavioral effects of neonatal and juvenile TBI (jTBI) were characterized using mice. At an age of post-natal 7 or 10 days, mice underwent moderate or severe closed skull impact or sham surgery. Behavioral testing was conducted at 6 and 8 months post-injury. Tests administered included the open field activity (general activity levels), zero maze (anxiety), forced swim (depression), rotarod (coordination and balance), and water maze (general/spatial learning). jTBI mice showed elevated activity levels, impaired sensorimotor abilities, impaired spatial learning, and less efficient spatial search strategy use compared with sham animals. These differences were consistent and stable up to 8 months post-injury, suggesting that deficits acquired as the result of a TBI can have long-lasting behavioral impacts.

LLU Discipline

Clinical Psychology

Department

Psychology

School

School of Science and Technology

First Advisor

Hartman, Richard E.

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Degree Level

M.A.

Year Degree Awarded

January 2011

Date (Title Page)

3-1-2011

Language

English

Library of Congress/MESH Subject Headings

Brain injuries; Trauma; Infant Behavior

Subject - Local

Longitudinal Behavioral Assessment -- Infants, Neonatal Traumatic Brain Injury

Type

Thesis

Page Count

70 p.

Digital Format

Application/PDF

Digital Publisher

Loma Linda University Libraries

Usage Rights

This title appears here courtesy of the author, who has granted Loma Linda University a limited, non-exclusive right to make this publication available to the public. The author retains all other copyrights.

Collection

Loma Linda University Electronic Theses & Dissertations

Collection Website

http://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/

Repository

Loma Linda University. Del E. Webb Memorial Library. University Archives

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